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Breaking News - NJDOT Issues Overweight Waiver for Fuel Trucks

13 May 2021 10:27 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

At the request of New Jersey Motor Truck Association and Fuel Merchants Association, the NJDOT issued a waiver to increase weight on fuel trucks by up to 10% or 88,000 pounds. Click here for NJDOT waiver.

Please note you will need an overweight permit. Go to Home (gotpermits.com)

The USDOT just issued an emergency order which allows overweight fuel trucks w ith permits to operate on the interstate system providing the state also issues a waiver. Click here for announcement.

EPA ISSUES FUEL WAIVERS

2021 Fuel Waivers

Alabama, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Specific Counties of Florida, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia

On May 11, 2021, EPA issued a waiver of the requirements for low volatility conventional gasoline and Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) in Alabama, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Specific Counties of Florida, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The waiver begins May 11, 2021, and ends May 31, 2021. 

Fuel Waiver Concerning Multi-state.

District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia 

On May 11, 2021, EPA issued an emergency waiver of the low volatility Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) requirements in RFG Covered Areas in District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. This waiver is a response to the unexpected Colonial Pipeline shutdown. The waiver begins May 11, 2021, and ends May 18, 2021.  Fuel Waiver Concerning Multi-state.

FMCSA - Although some states are issuing emergency declarations for size and weight we have to be cautious.

173.24b(d)(2) states; a bulk packaging may not be loaded with a hazardous material that except as otherwise provided in this subchapter exceeds the maximum weight of lading marked on the specification plate.

In the past, we have seen issues where the cargo tanks operating under similar emergency declarations have been overloaded with product (usually diesel fuel as its weight per gallon is almost a pound more per gallon than gasoline) and it exceeded the maximum product load that the cargo tank is designed to transport. That is of concern as it may cause additional stresses being subjected to the cargo tank. To my knowledge, PHMSA has never issued any emergency relief on this in the past when states impose emergency declarations on weight limits (both gross weight and axle weight).

Each manufacturer and tank is designed separately so there is no across the board criteria, each tank would be treated based on the load limits listed on the plate and each carrier would need to know this information to ensure it was not overloading the tank could have structural consequences on the tank over time.

As an example, gasoline weighs on average 6.19 lbs per gallon, and diesel fuel weighs 7.02 lbs per gallon. So with the above specification plate if it were a 9,400 gallon capacity tank (just grabbed the first example I could find and gallon capacity is not listed on the tank) that was loaded with 9,400 gallons of diesel fuel at 7.02 lbs per gallon the maximum load would weigh 65,988 lbs… which would exceed the limit of the tank marked at 63, 900 lbs by 2,088 lbs maximum capacity and be a violation of the HMR – specifically 173.24b(d)(2).


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