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  • 22 Mar 2019 9:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Consistent with 23 U.S.C. 127 (s) and N.J.S.A. 39:3-84.1, the State of New Jersey will allow an increased registration weight up to 82,000 pounds for vehicles operated by an engine fueled primarily by natural gas.  Such a vehicle may exceed any vehicle weight limit (up to a maximum gross vehicle weight of 82,000 pounds) by an amount that is equal to the difference between:

    1. the weight of the vehicle attributable to the natural gas tank and fueling system carried by that vehicle; and
    2. The weight of a comparable diesel tank and fueling system.

    The New Jersey fee table is not changed. For these vehicles, the maximum registration fee rate (80,000 pounds) will be applied.


  • 03 Mar 2019 3:25 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Governor Murphy has declared a State of Emergency and Colonel Patrick J. Callahan has announced a commercial vehicle travel restriction due to the anticipated severity of the impending winter storm. Effective, Sunday, March 3, 2019 at 3:00 PM, there will be a commercial vehicle travel restriction for the following roadways:

    • I-287 (entire length)
    • I-80 (entire length)
    • I-280 (entire length)
    • I-78 (entire length)
    • I-295 (entire length)
    • I-195 (entire length)
    • I-676 (entire length)
    • I-76 (entire length)

    The commercial vehicle travel restriction does NOT apply to the following roadways:

    • New Jersey Turnpike
    • Garden State Parkway
    • Atlantic City Expressway


  • 26 Feb 2019 8:49 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) officials today announced the Route 495 eastbound Columbia Avenue exit ramp to Paterson Plank Road will be closed and detoured beginning tomorrow for several weeks as the Route 495 Bridge over Route 1&9 and Paterson Plank Road project advances in North Bergen.

    In addition to the ramp closure, one lane of Route 495 eastbound will be closed overnight on Wednesday to pour concrete.

    Columbia Avenue exit ramp to Paterson Plank Road closure

    Between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., tomorrow, Tuesday, February 26, NJDOT’s contractor, IEW Corp, is scheduled to install concrete barrier to close the Columbia Avenue exit ramp to Paterson Plank Road. No lane closures are necessary for the installation of the barrier, however, there will be periodic temporary stopping of Route 495 eastbound traffic for a few minutes during that two-hour time period.

    Motorists are advised to expect delays while the barrier is being installed. The exit ramp will be closed and detoured for several weeks. Access from Columbia Avenue to the 30th Street ramp to Kennedy Boulevard will be maintained. The following detour will be in place:

    Columbia Avenue Exit to Paterson Plank Road

    • Motorists on Route 495 eastbound will be directed to continue on the 30th Street ramp to Kennedy Boulevard
    • Turn left on Kennedy Boulevard
    • Turn onto Bergen Turnpike
    • Turn left on Union Turnpike
    • Turn left on Liberty Avenue
    • Stay straight to continue on Paterson Plank Road

    Route 495 eastbound lane closure Wednesday night Beginning at 9 p.m. Wednesday, February 27, until 5 a.m. the next day, NJDOT’s contractor, IEW Corp, is scheduled to close one lane of Route 495 eastbound to pour the concrete deck. Two lanes will be maintained.

    The $90.3 million state-funded project began in September 2017. The project to rehabilitate the nine-span viaduct includes repairs and reconstruction of the bridge deck, replacement and strengthening of deteriorated structural steel, and the repair and painting of the substructure. Construction will be accomplished in stages by first making improvements to local streets in the surrounding areas that will need to handle some of the diverted traffic during bridge construction.

    Community Outreach
    NJDOT created a project-specific website – www.RestoreNJ495.com – which contains a wealth of information about the Route 495 Bridge rehabilitation, and will be updated with relevant new information as work progresses. The Department is carefully coordinating the Route 495 Bridge rehabilitation project with other regional transportation infrastructure projects to minimize traffic congestion.

    The Department has a project hotline telephone number, 201.408.8495, and email, DOTOutreachRT495@dot.nj.gov. Anyone who has questions, concerns, or suggestions is encouraged to contact the Project Outreach Team as work progresses.

    NJDOT will be using Variable Message Signs to provide advance notification to motorists of traffic pattern changes associated with the work.  The precise timing of the work is subject to change due to weather or other factors.

    Follow the project on Twitter @RestoreNJ495 and get real-time information on traffic conditions at www.511nj.org, where a widget will enable you to cut through all the other traffic information and focus in on the Route 495 area. For NJDOT news follow us on Twitter @NJDOT_info and our Facebook page.


  • 20 Feb 2019 5:30 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The commercial vehicle ban has been lifted on the roadways below:

    Colonel Patrick J. Callahan has announced a commercial vehicle travel restriction due to the anticipated severity of the impending winter storm. Effective, Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 9:00 AM, there will be a commercial vehicle travel restriction for the following roadways:

    * I-287 (entire length)

    * I-80 (entire length)

    * I-280 (entire length)

    * I-78 (entire length)

    * I-295 (entire length)

    * I-195 (entire length)

    * I-676 (entire length)

    * I-76 (entire length)

    The commercial vehicle travel restriction does NOT apply to the following roadways:

    * New Jersey Turnpike

    * Garden State Parkway

    * Atlantic City Expressway

    CLICK HERE for more information


  • 20 Feb 2019 9:05 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    PennDOT has announced travel restrictions for Wednesday ahead of expected winter weather.

    At 6 a.m. Wednesday, a full commercial vehicle ban (including buses) will be in place on I-70 in Fulton County (from the Maryland state line to the Turnpike); I-99 from I-80 to the Turnpike; and I-80 from I-79 to the I-99 interchange.

    Also at 6 a.m. Wednesday, on I-80 from I-79 to the I-99 interchange and on the Turnpike from New Stanton (exit 75) east to Carlisle (exit 226), the Turnpike will prohibit:

    • empty, straight CDL-weighted trucks;
    • all Large Combination Vehicles (double trailers);
    • tractors hauling empty trailers;
    • any trailers pulled by motorcycles, passenger vehicles, pickup trucks or SUVs;
    • all motorcycles; and
    • all recreational vehicles and RVs.

    At noon on Wednesday, PennDOT and the PA Turnpike will prohibit only empty, straight CDL-weighted trucks; all Large Combination Vehicles (double trailers); tractors hauling empty trailers; any trailers pulled by motorcycles, passenger vehicles, pickup trucks or SUVs; all motorcycles; and all recreational vehicles and RVs on the following roadways:

    • PA Turnpike (I-76, I-276,) from I-81 to I-95 (Exit 43);
    • I-76 (Turnpike and non-Turnpike, New Stanton to Philadelphia);
    • I-78 full length from I-81 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-80 from I-99 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-81 from the Maryland state line to the New York state line;
    • I-83 from the Maryland state line to I-81;
    • I-84 full length from I-81 to the New York state line;
    • I-176;
    • I-180 full length from Route 220/U.S. 15 to I-80;
    • I-276; PA Turnpike
    • I-283;
    • I-295;
    • I-380 full length from I-81 to I-80;
    • I-476 (non-Turnpike, full length);
    • I-476 (PA Turnpike, Northeast Ext.) from Mid County (exit 20) to Clarks Summit (exit 131);
    • I-676;
    • Route 22 from I-78 to the New Jersey state line; and
    • Route 33 from I-78 to I-80.

    Click here for the full map of PennDOT’s travel restrictions.


  • 13 Feb 2019 12:46 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Elizabeth, N.J., Feb. 11, 2019 /PRNewswire/ – New England Motor Freight, Inc. (the “Company” or “NEMF”) today announced that the Company and ten related entities have voluntarily filed for relief under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Jersey in Newark on February 11, 2019. NEMF intends to use these proceedings to facilitate an orderly wind-down of its operations.

    Vincent Colistra, a Senior Managing Director with Phoenix Management Services, Inc., and Chief Restructuring Officer for the Company, said, “We have worked hard to explore options for New England Motor Freight, but the macro-economic factors confronting this industry are significant.

    Upon the recommendation of its advisors, the Company has determined that a Chapter 11 proceeding is the best mechanism to maximize the value of its assets for the benefit of its employees and various creditor constituencies.
    Phoenix Management Services is serving as the Company’s financial and restructuring advisor.

    About New England Motor Freight

    New England Motor Freight, Inc. provides less-than-truckload (LTL) carrier services in the United States and Canada. Founded in 1977, the company is based in Elizabeth, New Jersey, and has terminals in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic.


  • 11 Feb 2019 8:53 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Transportation officials in Pennsylvania have issued a large-scale commercial vehicle travel ban to go into effect on Tuesday, February 12, in anticipation of snowfall and freezing rain.

    A full commercial vehicle ban will take effect at midnight (12 a.m.) on Tuesday on the following roadways:

    • I-70 in Fulton County (from the Maryland state line to the Penn. Turnpike)
    • I-99 from I-80 to the Penn. Turnpike

    A full commercial vehicle ban will also go into effect on the following roadways at 6 a.m. on Tuesday:

    • Interstate 380 full length from I-81 to I-80;
    • I-80 from I-79 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-81 from I-78 to the New York state line;
    • I-84 full length from I-81 to the New York state line;
    • I-476 (PA Turnpike, Northeast Ext.) from I-78 to Clarks Summit (exit 131);
    • I-180 full length from Route 220/U.S. 15 to I-80.

    An additional commercial vehicle ban for empty, straight CDL-weighted trucks; all Large combination vehicles (double trailers); and tractors hauling empty trailers will also be implemented at 6:00 a.m. on Tuesday on the following roads:

    • PA Turnpike (I-76, I-276, I-95) from I-81 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-176;
    • I-283;
    • I-476 (non-Turnpike, full length);
    • I-476 (PA Turnpike, Northeast Ext.) from Mid-County (#20) to Lehigh Valley (exit 56);
    • I-676;
    • I-76 (Turnpike and non-Turnpike, New Stanton to Philadelphia);
    • I-78 full length from I-81 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-81 from the Maryland state line to I-78 split;
    • I-83 from the Maryland state line to I-81;
    • I-95 full length;
    • Route 22 from I-78 to the New Jersey state line;
    • Route 33 from I-78 to I-80.
    • PA Turnpike (I-76, I-276, I-95) from I-81 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-176;
    • I-283;
    • I-476 (non-Turnpike, full length);
    • I-476 (PA Turnpike, Northeast Ext.) from Mid-County (#20) to Lehigh Valley (exit 56);
    • I-676;
    • I-76 (Turnpike and non-Turnpike, New Stanton to Philadelphia);
    • I-78 full length from I-81 to the New Jersey state line;
    • I-81 from the Maryland state line to I-78 split;
    • I-83 from the Maryland state line to I-81;
    • I-95 full length;
    • Route 22 from I-78 to the New Jersey state line;
    • Route 33 from I-78 to I-80.


     In addition, a 45-mile-per-hour speed limit will be in place on all roads with vehicle restrictions.

    addition, a 45-mile-per-hour speed limit will be in place on all roads with vehicle restrictions.


  • 05 Feb 2019 11:33 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) today released an analysis of the impacts that emerging e-commerce trends are having on the trucking industry, including the challenges and opportunities that more regionalized retail supply chains and the proliferation of urban “last mile” deliveries have presented. This research was identified as a top research priority by ATRI’s Research Advisory Committee.

    The analysis provides background on emerging e-commerce and omni-channel retailing trends, and maps the implications of these trends to trucking operations and the industry’s top ten issues. Key findings in ATRI’s report include:

    ·     From 1999-2017, e-commerce sales increased from less than one percent of total U.S. retail sales to more than nine percent, reflecting a 3,000 percent increase in e-commerce sales.

    ·     Annual growth of e-commerce has ranged between 13 and 16 percent over the last five years, outpacing the one to five percent annual growth in traditional retail sales.

    ·     Retailers are becoming more flexible in how they transact with consumers by decentralizing their distribution/fulfillment networks to bring inventory closer to consumers.

    ·     There were 2,130 fewer department stores and 385,000 fewer jobs at these stores in 2017 compared to 2015; there were 1,937 more courier services operating and just over 85,000 new employees hired in the sector during this time period. 

    ·     “Last Mile Fulfillment Centers” represented 73 percent of the industrial real estate market in 2017, a 15 percentage point increase from the previous year.

    ·     Registrations for single-unit trucks increased by 7.8 percent between 2007 and 2016 compared to 4.4 percent growth in combination truck registrations.

    ·     The number of intra-regional and last-mile truck trips has increased while the average length of haul has declined.  Average trip lengths have decreased 37 percent since 2000, while urban vehicle miles traveled have increased for much of this time period. 

    ·     Intrastate and local hauls for e-commerce could serve as a training opportunity for 18-20-year-old drivers, representing a huge new pool of potential interstate CDL drivers.

    “ATRI’s research provides a critical roadmap for trucking industry stakeholders to address the challenges and benefits of e-commerce and omni-channel retailing,” said Tom Benusa, CIO of Transport America. “These trends are game-changing, and our industry must adapt quickly to ensure that trucking continues to be the preeminent freight mode.”

     You can download a copy of this report here.  

  • 29 Jan 2019 9:17 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    AMENDED REGIONAL EMERGENCY DECLARATION
    UNDER 49 CFR § 390.23
    No. 2019-001

    CONNECTICUT, ILLINOIS, INDIANA, IOWA, KANSAS, KENTUCKY, MAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, MISSOURI, MISSISSIPPI, NEBRASKA, NEW HAMPSIRE, NEW JERSEY, NEW YORK, OHIO, PENNSYLVANIA, RHODE ISLAND, TENNESSEE, VERMONT AND WISCONSIN

    In accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR § 390.23, the Regional Field Administrators for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's (FMCSA) Midwestern and Southern Service Centers and the Field Administrator for FMCSA's Eastern Service Center, hereby declare that an emergency exists that warrants issuance of a Regional Emergency Declaration and an exemption from Parts 390 through 399 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs), except as otherwise restricted in this Emergency Declaration. Such emergency is in response to significant winter storms and anticipated heating and other fuel shortages in the Affected States. This Declaration addresses the anticipated emergency conditions creating a need for immediate transportation of heating fuels, including propane, natural gas, and heating oil, and other fuel products, including gasoline, into the Affected States and provides necessary relief. Affected States included in this Emergency Declaration are: Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont and Wisconsin.

    By execution of this extension of the Emergency Declaration, motor carriers and drivers providing direct assistance supporting emergency relief efforts transporting heating fuel, including propane, natural gas and heating oil, .and other fuel products, including gasoline, into the Affected States are granted emergency relief from Parts 390 through 399 of Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations except as restricted herein.

    Direct assistance terminates when a driver or commercial motor vehicle is used in interstate commerce to transport cargo or provide services not directly supporting the emergency relief effort or when the motor carrier dispatches a driver or commercial motor vehicle to another location to begin operations in commerce. Upon termination of direct assistance to the emergency relief effort, the motor carrier and driver are subject to the requirements of 49 CFR Parts 390 through 399, except that a driver may return empty to the motor carrier's terminal or the driver's normal work reporting location without complying with Parts 390 through 399. However, if the driver informs the motor carrier that he or she needs immediate rest, the driver must be permitted at least 10 consecutive hours off duty before the driver is required to return to the motor carrier's terminal or the driver's normal reporting location. Once the driver has returned to the terminal or other location, the driver must be relieved of all duty and responsibilities and must receive a minimum of 10 hours off duty if transporting property, and 8 hours if transporting passengers.

    Nothing contained in this Emergency Declaration shall be construed as an exemption from the controlled substances and alcohol use and testing requirements (49 CFR Part 382), the commercial driver's license requirements (49 CFR Part 383), the financial responsibility (insurance) requirements (49 CFR Part 3 87), the hazardous material regulations (49 CFR Parts 100-180), applicable size and weight requirements, or any other portion of the regulations not specifically authorized pursuant to 49 CFR § 390.23.

    Motor carriers or drivers currently subject to an out-of-service order are not eligible for the relief granted by this declaration until they have met the applicable conditions for its rescission and the order has been rescinded by FMCSA. In accordance with 49 CFR § 390.23, this declaration is effective immediately and shall remain in effect for the duration of the emergency (as defined in 49 CFR § 390.5) or until 11 :59 P.M. (ET), February 2, 2019, ~hichever is less.

    Taft Kelly, Field Administrator
    Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
    Eastern Service Center

    G. Jones, Regional Field Administrator
    Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
    Midwestern Service Center

    Darrell L. Ruban, Regional Field Administrator
    Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
    Southern Service Center


  • 29 Jan 2019 9:08 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Small and wearable electronic devices used in workplaces (e.g., body cameras) rely on a power source that stores a high amount of energy in a small space (i.e., high energy density). Lithium cells provide sustained power and often have the capability to recharge. When designed, manufactured, and used properly, lithium batteries are a safe, high energy density power source for devices in the workplace.

    While lithium batteries are normally safe, they may cause injury if they have design defects, are made of low quality materials, are assembled incorrectly, are used or recharged improperly, or are damaged. In February 2018, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Status Report on High Energy Density Batteries Project reported over 25,000 overheating or fire incidents involving more than 400 types of lithium battery-powered consumer products that occurred over a five-year period.

    Many consumer products have practical applications in small and large businesses. Ensuring these products will operate safely in workplaces begins with using batteries, chargers, and associated equipment that are tested in accordance with an appropriate test standard (e.g., UL 2054) and certified by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL). Manufacturer’s instructions provide procedures for use, charging, and maintenance that is specific to each device and necessary to prevent damage to the lithium batteries (See Image 1). For example, some batteries will overcharge if a charger is used that does not turn off when the battery is fully charged.

    Image 1: Example of lithium-metal batteries | Photo Credit: Associated Press (AP)


    Image 2: Small wearable camera | Photo Credit: Photo by: Andreas Arnold/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

    Image 2. Small wearable camera
    Source/Copyright: Andreas Arnold/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

    Workers who wear or frequently handle lithium-powered devices or batteries are particularly at risk if a lithium battery catches fire or explodes since the device or battery is close to the body. For example, small cameras worn by workers (e.g., police and security personnel), as shown in Image 2, can cause burns or other serious injury if the lithium battery catches fire or explodes while worn. To prevent injury, it is important for employers and workers to understand a lithium-powered device’s basic function, hazards, and safe use.

    Prevention

    Workplace injuries from lithium battery defects or damage are preventable and the following guidelines will assist in incorporating lithium battery safety into an employer’s Safety and Health Program:

    • Ensure lithium batteries, chargers, and associated equipment are tested in accordance with an appropriate test standard (e.g., UL 2054) and certified by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL), and are rated for their intended uses.
    • Follow manufacturer’s instructions for storage, use, charging, and maintenance.
    • When replacing batteries and chargers for an electronic device, ensure they are specifically designed and approved for use with the device and they are purchased from the device’s manufacturer or a manufacturer authorized reseller.
    • Remove lithium-powered devices and batteries from the charger once they are fully charged.
    • Store lithium batteries and devices in dry, cool locations and in fire-resistant containers.
    • Avoid damaging lithium batteries and devices. Inspect them for signs of damage, such as bulging/cracking, hissing, leaking, rising temperature, and smoking before use, especially if they are wearable. Immediately remove a device or battery from service and place it in an area away from flammable materials if any of these signs are present.
    • If batteries are damaged, remove from service and dispose in accordance with local, state, and federal regulations. Contact a local battery recycling center for disposal instructions.
    • Follow the employer’s policy or manufacturer’s guidance on how to extinguish small battery fires, which could include using CO2, foam, Class D fire extinguishers (for lithium-metal), ABC dry chemical extinguishers, dirt, or sand.

    Training

    Ensure that workers handling lithium-powered devices, cells, or batteries in the workplace receive training associated with these products, including training on how to:

    • Verify NRTL certification for batteries, chargers, and associated equipment.
    • Identify defective, damaged, or failing lithium-powered devices and batteries.
    • Remove defective devices or batteries from the workplace.
    • Quickly remove a lithium-powered device from clothing if it feels hot or if the device is leaking, releasing gas, hissing, bulging/cracking, or on fire.

    Ensure that an emergency action plan (EAP) for a workplace with lithium-powered devices or batteries includes lithium-related incident response procedures based on manufacturer’s instructions for responding to battery failures including fires or explosions.

    Ensure that appropriate information about the hazards of lithium-powered devices and lithium batteries is communicated to exposed workers (e.g., during repair of lithium-powered devices or during recycling activities) and that workers receive training on the physical and health hazards associated with lithium-ion and/or lithium-metal cells or batteries.

    To read the entire OSHA Bulletin, go to https://www.osha.gov/dts/shib/shib011819.html.


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