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  • 06 Oct 2021 1:38 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Law enforcement officers in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. stopped 46,058 passenger vehicle and commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers engaging in dangerous driving behaviors during the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) Operation Safer Driver Week safety initiative.

    Officers pulled over 28,148 commercial motor vehicles and 17,910 passenger vehicles July 11-17 and issued 10,486 warnings and 16,863 citations. Throughout the week, law enforcement personnel pulled over and issued warnings or citations to drivers they observed engaging in dangerous driving behaviors, such as speeding or distracted driving. The goal of Operation Safe Driver Week is to dissuade dangerous driving behaviors through interactions between drivers engaging in risky driving behaviors and law enforcement officers, and through a heightened law enforcement presence on our roadways.

    Table 1: Top Five Warnings and Citations:

    Violation Citations Violation Warnings
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 11,039 1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 5,478
    2 Failure to use a seat belt 2,580 2 Failure to use a seat belt 1,308
    3 Texting/Distracted driving/ using a handheld phone 917 3 Failure to obey traffic control device 1,069
    4 Failure to obey a traffic control device

    858

     

    4 Texting/Distracted driving/ using a handheld phone 659
    5 Improper lane change 386 5 Improper lane change 682

    Segmented by driver type:

    Table 2: Top Five Passenger Vehicle Driver Warnings and Citations:

    Violation Citations Violation Warnings
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 9,349 1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 2,929
    2 Failure to use a seat belt 1,355 2 Improper lane change 442
    3 Distracted driving/using a handheld phone 573 3

    Failure to use a seat belt

     

    354
    4 Possession/use/under influence of alcohol or drugs

     

    428

    4 Distracted driving/using a handheld phone 323
    5 Failure to obey a traffic control device

    336

     

    5 Failure to obey traffic control device 200

    Table 3: Top Five Commercial Motor Vehicle Driver Warnings and Citations:

    Violation Citations Violation Warnings
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 1,690 1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 2,549
    2 Failure to use a seat belt

    1,225

     

    2

    Failure to use a seat belt

     

    954
    3 Failure to obey traffic control device 522 3 Failure to obey traffic control device 869
    4 Texting/using a handheld phone 344 4 Texting/using a handheld phone 336
    5 Improper lane change 112 5 Following too closely 310

    Speeding, which was the focus of this year’s Operation Safe Driver Week, was the top driver-behavior violation for both types of drivers. Officers issued 11,039 citations and 5,478 warnings for speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions. That’s 9,349 citations and 2,929 warnings for speed-related offenses to passenger vehicle drivers, and 1,690 speed-related citations and 2,549 warnings to commercial motor vehicle drivers.

    Failure to wear a seat belt was the second most-cited violation, with 2,580 total citations and 1,308 warnings. Officers issued 1,355 citations and 354 warnings to passenger vehicle drivers, and 1,225 citations and 954 warnings to commercial motor vehicle drivers.

    Law enforcement personnel also issued 9,302 warnings and 8,484 citations to drivers for state/local driver violations. Examples of such violations may include vehicle-related observations an officer may notice during a traffic stop, such as equipment violations, expired license plate tags, inoperative lamps, etc. Broken out by driver type, commercial motor vehicle drivers received 6,631 warnings and 4,007 citations, and passenger vehicle drivers were issued 2,671 warnings and 4,477 citations.

    In addition to traffic enforcement, 2,469 motorists were assisted during Operation Safe Driver Week, highlighting law enforcement’s commitment to public service and roadway safety. Motorist assistance may include help fixing a flat tire, providing gasoline for a stranded vehicle, checking on someone who may be pulled over, assisting individuals in distress or experiencing a medical emergency, jump-starting a vehicle, traffic control, etc.

    Canada

    In Canada, officers pulled over 1,828 commercial motor vehicle drivers and 7,759 passenger vehicle drivers engaging in dangerous driving behaviors, and issued 275 warnings and 4,020 citations. Broken out, that’s 136 warnings and 593 citations for commercial motor vehicle drivers, and 139 warnings and 3,427 citations to passenger vehicle drivers.

    Table 4: Top Three Warnings – Canada

    Passenger Vehicle Drivers Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers
    Violation Warnings Violation Warnings
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 82 1 Failure to wear a seat belt 38
    2 Failure to obey a traffic control device 21 2 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 35
    3 Failure to wear a seat belt 10 3 Operating while ill or fatigued 22

    Table 5: Top Three Citations – Canada

    Passenger Vehicle Drivers Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers
    Violation Citations Violation Citations
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 2,861 1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 289
    2 Failure to use a seat belt 172 2 Failure to wear a seat belt 160
    3 Failure to obey a traffic control device 155 3 Texting/using a handheld phone 83

    Mexico

    In Mexico, officers pulled over 2,449 commercial motor vehicle drivers and 785 passenger vehicle drivers for unsafe driving behaviors. Officers issued a total of 1,689 warnings and 528 citations. That’s 1,115 warnings and 412 citations for commercial motor vehicle drivers, and 574 warnings and 116 citations to passenger vehicle drivers.

    Table 6: Top Three Warnings – Mexico

    Passenger Vehicle Drivers Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers
    Violation Warnings Violation Warnings
    1 Failure to wear a seat belt 136 1 Failure to wear a seat belt 314
    2 Following too closely 95 2

    Following too closely

     

    182

     

    3 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 90 3 Texting/using a handheld phone 159

    Table 7: Top Three Citations – Mexico

    Passenger Vehicle Drivers Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers
    Violation Citations Violation Citations
    1 Failure to use a seat belt 66 1 Failure to use a seat belt 274
    2 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 39 2 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 76
    3 Failure to obey a traffic control device 5 3 Improper lane change 39

    U.S.

    In the U.S., officers pulled over 23,871 commercial motor vehicle drivers and 9,366 passenger vehicle drivers engaging in unsafe driving behaviors. Law enforcement personnel issued a total of 8,438 warnings and 12,264 citations, made up of 4,420 warnings and 3,158 citations to commercial motor vehicle drivers, and 4,018 warnings and 9,106 citations to passenger vehicle drivers.

    Table 8: Top Five Warnings – U.S.

    Passenger Vehicle Drivers Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers
    Violation Warnings Violation Warnings
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 2,757 1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 2,386
    2 Improper lane change 333 2 Failure to obey traffic control device 775
    3 Distracted driving/using a handheld phone 230 3 Failure to wear a seat belt 602
    4 Failure to use a seat belt 208 4 Texting/using a handheld phone

    163

     

    5 Improper turn 154 5 Improper lane change 150

    Table 9: Top Five Citations – U.S.

    Passenger Vehicle Drivers Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers
    Violation Citations Violation Citations
    1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 6,449 1 Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions 1,325
    2 Failure to use a seat belt 1,117 2 Failure to wear a seat belt 791
    3 Distracted driving/using a handheld phone 480 3 Failure to obey traffic control device 498
    4 Possession/use/under influence of alcohol 320 4 Texting/using a handheld phone 246
    5 Improper lane change 255 5 Improper lane change 70

    In addition to the data submitted to CVSA from its member jurisdictions in Canada, Mexico and U.S., the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) also participated in this year’s Operation Safe Driver Week. The agency ran an investigative event, parallel to the Operation Safe Driver Week roadside activities, targeting motor carriers with a history of crashes and unsafe driving behavior.

    FMCSA’s investigative event ran for seven weeks, from June 7 to July 16, with participation from all its divisions. The agency prioritized moderate-risk and high-risk carriers for remote on-site and off-site investigations.

    FMCSA field staff completed 90 high-risk and 201 moderate-risk carrier investigations, resulting in 64 conditional ratings and 30 unsatisfactory ratings. Three driver notices of claim are planned, 21 carriers entered the denial of access process, 10 out-of-service orders were issued and one pattern of safety violations case is under review. Out of 291 investigations, nine resulted in enforcement for the violation of 392.2 – unsafe driving.

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 94% of car crashes are caused by drivers. And when a passenger vehicle collides with a large commercial motor vehicle, the result can be catastrophic. The majority of deaths in large-truck crashes are occupants of the passenger vehicle (71%), followed by the truck’s occupants (18%). CVSA’s Operation Safe Driver Week aims to prevent CMV-involved crashes through interactions between law enforcement and drivers.

    “Since we know that most crashes are caused by drivers, the best way to prevent crashes is to start with the cause – drivers,” said CVSA President Capt. John Broers with South Dakota Highway Patrol. “If seeing a patrol car causes a driver to slow down in a high-risk crash area of the roadway, then we’ll put patrol cars in that area. If being stopped by an officer causes that driver to be more conscientious, then our officers will pull over unsafe drivers. We will continue to do our part to make our roadways as safe as possible.”

    In partnership with the federal government, the law enforcement community and the motor carrier industry, CVSA launched the Operation Safe Driver program to reduce the number of deaths and injuries resulting from dangerous driving behaviors.


  • 29 Sep 2021 9:47 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The American Transportation Research Institute today released research that describes a framework for electric vehicle (EV) taxation to support transportation infrastructure.  Through a small tax on the electricity that is used in transportation, the report identifies an approach to efficiently connecting the growing number of U.S. electric vehicles with highway trust fund (HTF) revenue streams. 

    At present, electric vehicles do not contribute substantively to state and federal highway trust funds. In fact, there are numerous programs that subsidize the use of electric vehicles, thus exacerbating the infrastructure investment deficit. ATRI’s analysis quantifies this revenue loss at more than $4 billion over the next 10 years.  

    The report suggests that U.S. electric utilities are well equipped to begin collection of a per-kWh charge of 2.1 cents for transportation-related electricity consumption in the coming years. Using a phased approach, utilities would identify, measure and tax electricity that is used for transportation – starting first with electricity that is dispersed through public charging stations and residential smart chargers. 

    “This analysis demonstrates how an electricity tax can easily emulate all the key components of a fuel tax. Moving forward with an efficient utility-based approach will help EV owners support the infrastructure that they use every day,” said Paul Enos, CEO of the Nevada Trucking Association. 

    For access to the full report please visit ATRI’s website at TruckingResearch.org.


  • 24 Sep 2021 5:37 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    IMPORTANT Webinar - Register today!

    The Owner-Operator Model - Avoiding Misclassification

    This Thursday, September 30th - 10 am - 11 am

    Guest Speaker Greg Feary, Scopelitis Law Firm

    This webinar will discuss:

    • Current legal landscape & the future outlook
    • Current Case Law Trends
    • National landscape Heat Maps
    • Beast Practices for motor carriers utilizing owner-operators

    Complementary Webinar sponsored by NJMTA Member True North Insurance for NJMTA members

    Click HERE REGISTER

  • 18 Aug 2021 1:46 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The American Transportation Research Institute today launched a new data collection initiative to better understand the motivating factors for being an owner-operator, independent contractor, or company driver. This research was identified by ATRI’s Research Advisory Committee as a top research priority in 2020. 

    Drivers are asked to provide input through an online data collection form that will measure what job-related factors contributed to becoming an owner-operator, independent contractor, or company driver and whether those expectations have been met. This timely research will provide valuable insight into understanding how drivers could be impacted by legislative and regulatory actions that may impact the way in which drivers are classified. 

    “This ATRI data collection initiative will be critical to understanding why drivers choose the type of employment they do. The motivations behind these choices and their level of satisfaction are important for understanding what types of employment opportunities drivers are looking for and why,” said Tom Weakley, OOIDA Foundation Director of Operations and a member of ATRI’s Research Advisory Committee. 

    The data collection form is available online here and drivers are asked to complete the survey by Friday, September 17, 2021. All submitted data will be kept strictly confidential and participants will receive an advance copy of the full report.


  • 19 Jul 2021 2:30 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Commercial motor vehicle inspectors in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. conducted 10,091 inspections and placed 1,273 vehicles out of service for brake-related critical vehicle inspection items on May 26. Inspectors tracked and reported this data to the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) for Brake Safety Day, the Alliance’s unannounced one-day inspection and enforcement initiative focused on brake systems.

    In addition, inspectors compiled and reported data specifically on brake hoses/tubing, the focus area for this year’s Brake Safety Day. Canada, Mexico and the U.S. reported a total of 1,725 brake hoses/tubing violations from the one-day unannounced brake safety initiative.

    View the full press release for much more data and information.


  • 19 Jul 2021 10:27 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The large ten foot table in Linden Mayor Derek Armstead's office is crowded with neatly organized files. It's understandable since the vacant land in his city has become attractive for warehouse facilities.

    The reality is that the tremendous need for warehouse space to meet the bustling Port of New York and New Jersey and the availability of vacant land and even some deserted retail box stores buildings has made the city an inviting location.

    So much so, that Linden officials claim to be hub of warehouse development - the largest in the entire east coast.  The lack of available space elsewhere and the potential at the city's Trembly Point road made the city a natural.

    Armstead points to the Linden's new logistics center along the New Jersey Turnpike with a staggering 840,000 square feet and a second building of 480,000 square feet both located less than 20 miles for New York City. With access from USI, Marine Terminal and the Turnpike the city became a natural for the ferocious warehouse surge.

    The difference is that while some communities such as Robbinsville and Piscataway have mounted legal challenges to warehousing, the vacant and underutilized land in Linden made it a welcome location.

    One published report estimated that 11.1 million square feet of warehouse space was leased just in the past fiscal quarter of 2021.  For the trucking industry the evening television shows urging online shopping means there has to be a place to store the goods before being delivered.

    The warehouse locations in Linden have become home to Amazon, and Walgreens among others.  For Mayor Armstead, the ability to provide new job opportunities, new tax ratables, and little demand for municipal services is a coup.

    For the motor carrier industry that volume growth equates to demand for providing supply to the goods to meet the expansion.

    By Frank Capece an attorney who represents Trucking Companies

  • 12 Jul 2021 10:34 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Piscataway Township PD requested our assistance in reminding motorists of a 10-ton weight limit on River Road between Rt. 18 and I-287.

    STMC: Beginning Tuesday, July 6, 2021 and continuing through Friday, August 6, 2021

    Please activate the following messages as described below.

    Please note that most of these VMS boards normally display travel times.  To minimize interference with travel time messages, we are dedicating only one of three boards on each highway for the messages below.

    We will alternate the messages on the other two boards, displaying travel times during rush hour as usual, and displaying the message below at all other times.

    VMS # 58 -    I-287 South @ Rt.  28 - Union Ave. (MP 13.6)

    VMS # 97 -   I-287 South @ Elizabeth Ave. (MP 11.5)

    VMS # 98 - I-287 North at S. Randolphville Rd. (MP 7.3)

    Message Activation Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2021 at 12:00 p.m.

    Message Activation Times on VMS #58:Run message steady beginning Tuesday, July 6, 2021 at 12:00 p.m. to Friday, August 6, 2021 at midnight.

    Message Activation Times on VMS #97 & #98:Run messages Weekdays & Weekends 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. (not to interfere with travel time messages).


    Message Deactivation Date: Friday, August 6, 2021 at midnight

    VMS # 165 – NJ 18 South @ Hoes Lane (MP 46.0)

    VMS # 122 - . NJ 18 North @ NJTPKE (MP 39.5)

    VMS # 171 - NJ 18 North @ River Rd. (MP 43.9)

    Message Activation Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2021 at 12:00 p.m.

    Message Activation Times on VMS #171:Run message steady beginning Tuesday, July 6, 2021 at 12:00 p.m. to Friday, August 6, 2021 at midnight.

    Message Activation Times on VMS #122 & #165: Run messages Weekdays & Weekends 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. (not to interfere with travel time messages).


    Message Deactivation Date: Friday, August 6, 2021 at midnight



  • 24 Jun 2021 3:57 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    With less than a week's notice, multiple misclassification bills were introduced and passed out of both the Senate and Assembly Labor Committees.

    S-3920, would provide the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) greater enforcement powers in regards to violations of state wage, benefit and tax laws. It would also provide additional enforcement options in the Office of Administrative Law and in the courts through subpoena powers and injunctive relief.

    This bill would permit the Commissioner to issue a stop-work order for one or more worksites, or across all the employer’s worksites. The orders remain in effect until the Commissioner finds that the employer has come into compliance and has paid any penalties assessed.

    S-3921, would create the “Office of Strategic Enforcement and Compliance” within LWD. It would oversee and coordinate across the divisions of the department and, when necessary, between the department and other state agencies and entities, for strategic enforcement of state wage, benefit, and tax laws, as deemed appropriate by the Commissioner.

    The bill would appropriate $1 million from the General Fund to the department to support and expand the Office of Strategic Enforcement and Compliance.

    The third bill, S-3922, would streamline the identification of employee misclassification. Specifically, the bill would make misclassifying employees for the purpose of evading payment of insurance premiums a violation of the New Jersey Insurance Fraud Prevention Act. The Act is currently silent on misclassifying employees as a form of insurance fraud.

    The bill would specify penalties for fraud when misclassification occurs as $5,000 for the first violation, $10,000 for the second violation and $15,000 for each subsequent violation.

    Identical bills were also passed in the Assembly (A5890/5891/5892)

    The bills passed out of the Assembly 6/21. Should be on Senate list for 6/30 vote.

    NJMTA Comments

    Listen to Labor Committee Hearings - excellent presentation by our lobbyist


  • 24 Jun 2021 3:51 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) has released it's proposed the Advanced Clean Truck (ACT) Program regulations and has moved forward with the rulemaking process. The NJDEP plans to adopt CARB's ACT regulations by reference. 

    The ACT regulations propose two separate requirements:

    1. Mandate that truck manufacturers begin manufacturing zero emission vehicles (ZEV) for any medium duty or heavy duty vehicle (MDHD) {8,500 GVWR or more} beginning with model year 2025. Manufacturers will earn a deficit for every non-ZEV MDHD they sell and a credit for every ZEV or near ZEV (NZEV) MDHD vehicle they sell. “Sell” is defined to mean a sale to an ultimate purchaser who registers the MDHD vehicle with the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission, not a sale from the manufacturer to a truck dealer. If, at the end of the year, the manufacturer has more deficits than credits, the manufacturer will need to purchase credits from other manufacturers. Credits begin in 2024 and are based by vehicle class. Credits can be banked but must be retired oldest to newest and by vehicle class. Deficits begin in 2025 and increase every year through 2035. Deficits are weighted based on variables such as model year, weight class of vehicle, and if the vehicle is a tractor.

    2. Require fleet owners to report 2021 data on their MDHD truck fleet to the NJDEP by April 2022. The purpose of this requirement is to establish a baseline for future rulemaking regarding MDHD ZEVs

    To View the Clean Trucks Proposed Rule

    NJMTA Comments on Proposed Clean Truck Rules


  • 21 Jun 2021 9:48 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Driver makes parenting, nurturing daughter a priority, even on the road.

    At two-years-old Evelyn is already starting to recognize words. She even sings along to nursery rhyme songs. It’s the result of a nighttime reading routine thanks to her father, driver Dane Christensen, and his wife, Kim, who make sure there is time for a story, even when daddy isn’t there.  

    Dane works as part of a sleeper team out of CACH, near Chicago, but makes time daily to be an active parent while traveling on the road. He schedules his driving time so he is able to read to Evelyn each night.

    Having a routine in place, Evelyn’s bedtime is at 8:30 p.m. Dane shared that either he or his wife, Kim, would call each other around 8:25 p.m. and start the evening with “Where’s daddy?”

     “We have a map, like the school maps…states are different colors and fun. We have ones of those up on the wall. It has a little UPS truck on it.”

    Dane says Evelyn and Kim move a passport size photo of him on the map to the state he is calling from. After a quick break to brush her teeth, it’s time for three songs and a story. As of late, Evelyn’s favorite story is The Lorax by Dr. Seuss. Her top ‘jams’ include: Itsy Bitsy Spider, Moon Moon Moon, and This Little Piggy, with an occasional Row Row Row Your Boat making her playlist cut.

    Dane started the routine of reading to Evelyn when he became a sleeper team driver for UPS in September 2019. Regularly reading to Evelyn benefits her cognitive recollection and it already shows.

    Evelyn recognizes books and sifts through the pile of books in her room to pick her own read for the night. “For a while Brown Bear, Brown Bear was one of her favorite books, and she goes “Brown Bear,” and then she would hand it to me or her mother,” Dane said.

    During the weekends when Dane is home, he and Kim keep their routine of reading and singing with Evelyn before bed. It’s a routine he believes in, “If we have any other children, I’m going to do it the exact same way.”

    Although Dane and his driving partner travel 5,337 miles for four to five days out of the week, through 11 mid-west and east coast states, it is worth it to Dane. This position allows him to spend more quality time with his family, in comparison to his prior job. “I actually get to see my family more often now, because I’m home for solid days.”


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